CalgaryNEXT project still viable, according to Calgary Flames group

Written by admin on 16/11/2018 Categories: 老域名购买

The head of the group that owns the Calgary Flames and Stampeders says he’s encouraged by what he heard back on the proposal for the CalgaryNEXT project from Calgary City Council Monday.

Councillors have asked the Calgary Sports and Entertainment Corporation (CSEC) to submit more information in a closed-door strategic planning session set for July.

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    “There are central tenets to our proposal; one is that West Village be developed, one is that the creosote be cleaned, and one is that the field house be built,” CSEC president and CEO Ken King said Monday.

    “If any one of those three tenets are pulled then we maybe have a real big hole, but it would appear that all of those are still germane to this discussion, so I’m thrilled, frankly.”

    Watch below: Global’s ongoing coverage of the CalgaryNEXT proposal

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    The cost of CalgaryNext, a new arena and sports complex proposed for Calgary last August, has almost doubled to $1.8 billion and was deemed “not feasible” according to a city report released last Wednesday. But the city seems to be open to further discussion on the project.

    READ MORE: Gary Bettman and Calgary mayor Nenshi clash over CalgaryNEXT

    The city administrators’ evaluation highlighted the fact the total cost of the creosote contaminant cleanup would not exceed $145 million, though recognized it could take six to ten years. Calgary Mayor Naheed Nenshi contemplated the cost and cleanup time following the meeting.

    “If you believe the environmental assessment, yes it’s cheaper than we thought to do the cleanup, but it’s going to take a lot of years, on the outside even 10 years,” Nenshi said. “You know it’s one of those problems you get when you interview for a job, how many dump trucks does it take over how much time to remove a whole bunch of dirt? And I don’t know how you speed that up.”

    Nenshi added the original company responsible for the pollution was purchased by Domtar, a major Canadian paper and pulp manufacturer. Nenshi said he’d encourage the provincial government, ultimately responsible for the cleanup, to discuss sharing the cost with Domtar.

    READ MORE: Who will pay for Calgary’s new arena?

    With files from Global’s Erika Tucker

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